Children’s Reading Resources

 

Six Essential Pre-Reading Skills

Skill Listing

Research has shown us that there are six early literacy skills that are essential for young children to become familiar with in order to be successful readers.These skills are:

  1. Vocabulary – Knowledge of the names of things. Most children enter school knowing between 3,000 and 5,000 words.
  2. Print Motivation – Interest in and enjoyment of books. A child with print motivation enjoys being read to, plays with books and pretends to write.
  3. Print Awareness – Knowledge of how to handle a book and how to follow words on a page. A child will point to the words on the page of a book.
  4. Letter Knowledge – Awareness that letters are different from each other. A child will know the names of letters and their sounds.
  5. Narrative Skills – Ability to create stories and to describe things. A child’s ability to relay what happens at a birthday party or on a trip to the zoo.
  6. Phonological Awareness – Ability to hear and play with the smaller sounds in words. A child will hear and create rhymes, say words with sounds or chunks left out and be able to put two word chunks together to make one word.

 

 

The children’s library contains books appropriate for all ages and reading levels.  Our collection includes:

  1.  Easy Picture Books – large books filled with detailed illustrations to capture young children’s attention and stories with longer, more complex sentences meant to be read to a child by a caregiver
  2. Easy Readers – the first books children read on their own.  Short stories with large print and easy to read words.  Easy Readers are marked to indicate suggested reading level
  3. CD Books – Children’s books in audio format, mostly unabridged versions, perfect for family car trip
  4. Easy Reader Nonfiction-the first books children read on their own. Short stories with large print and easy to read words. All nonfictional topics
  5. Easy Nonfiction- large books filled with detailed illustrations to capture young children’s att
    Logo of the Sequouyah Award site.

    Award lists, including current nominees, past nominees and past winners.

    ention and stories with longer, more complex sentences meant to be read to a child by a caregiver. All nonfictional topics.

Oklahoma Sequoyah Reading Award

Hennessey Public Library has copies of all the Sequoyah  Award Winning books.

With this award, Oklahoma honors the Native American leader Sequoyah, for his unique achievement in creating the Cherokee syllabary. Sequoyah chose eighty-five symbols to represent all spoken sounds of the Cherokee language. In so doing, he created a way to preserve his people’s language and culture.

 

Other Book Awards